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Creatives tend to be some of the most necessary, yet overlooked, people in society

I am a visual communication and industrial design graduate and am very much a photographer in my own right. Moreover, I’m also adept at showing projects by other designers in their absolute best light. I’ve worked with a host of designers to capture their work for portfolios and websites, bringing my own unique and crisp aesthetic to the images, but also allowing these fascinating objects to speak for themselves. It’s a well-established fact that even the most conceptually exciting product designs can fall flat on their face if they’re photographed poorly. Imagery can often make or break these projects. And while of course this isn’t the be-all and end-all, it’s worth taking this part of the process seriously to maximise the chances of your work cutting through the noise – which is essentially where I come in.

Wasting Food = Wasting Energy

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FAO’s Food Wastage Footprint: Impacts on Natural Resources is the first study to analyze the impacts of global food wastage from an environmental perspective, looking specifically at its consequences for the climate, water and land use, and biodiversity.

Some key findings from the report:

The carbon footprint of food produced and not eaten is estimated at 3.3 billion tons of greenhouse gases: making food wastage the third top GHG emitter after the U.S. and China.
Globally, the blue water footprint (i.e. the consumption of surface and groundwater resources) of food wastage is about 250 cubic kilometers (km3), which is equivalent to the annual water discharge of the Volga river, or three times the volume of Lake Geneva.
Produced but uneaten food occupies almost 1.4 billion hectares of land; representing nearly 30 percent of the world’s agricultural land area.
Fifty-four percent of the world’s food wastage occurs “upstream” during production, post-harvest handling and storage, according to FAO’s study. About 46 percent of it happens “downstream,” at the processing, distribution and consumption stages.

While it is difficult to estimate impacts on biodiversity at a global level, the report continues, “food wastage unduly compounds the negative externalities that mono-cropping and agriculture expansion into wild areas create on biodiversity loss, including mammals, birds, fish and amphibians https://www.triplepundit.com/2013/09/food-waste-big-time-hit-climate-water-land-biodiversity/
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barrett-gluth
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The United Nations estimates that one in nine people in the world do not have access to sufficient food to lead a healthy life. More people are reported to die from hunger every day than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. But at the same time, nearly one-third of the food that is produced in the world is lost or wasted due to one reason or the other. Food wastage, which includes both food loss and food waste, is not only morally irresponsible, but also causes huge economical losses as well as severe damage to the world around us
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What can be done to reduce food wastage?
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mandy2
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Food wastage has reached levels beyond one’s imagination. It has reached a point where we don’t even think once before dumping surplus food into the trash.
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The problem is a bit more complicated than it sounds, as food is currently wasted at several points along the supply chain: from farms, to grocery shelves, to restaurants, to our own kitchens. Wasteful practices have become so routine in our industrial food system that we often don’t recognize them.
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I believe in places like America, people do not consciously waste food or water, In fact these days many people are very cautious in their way of consumption. But the major gap is that they have not really seen shortage of food and water in their daily lives and it is very difficult for them to believe what shortage of food/water might feel like and thus do not realize while wasting
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There honestly isn’t that much you can do about food waste at the industrial level, or even at restaurants. What you do have control over is how much food you waste in your own house
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In England, a Chinese Restaurant charges monetary penalty if diners leave food on their plates. Similar things can be impelmented to reduce wastage of food. Having a note on every table which says"Please do not waste food", can go a long way! Social penalties can also be imposed.There be a dedicated campaign to expose restaurants, hotels, households, events, supermarkets etc who waste food on social media.
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I believe in places like America, people do not consciously waste food or water, In fact these days many people are very cautious in their way of consumption. But the major gap is that they have not really seen shortage of food and water in their daily lives and it is very difficult for them to believe what shortage of food/water might feel like and thus do not realize while wasting
In developing countries drinking water is supplied for only few hours a day and some days people may not even have water to take a decent bath. People are cautious enough to take bath with a bucket of water rather than taking a shower.
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Waste is common because of abundance.
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Waste is common because of abundance.
I am guilty of this, so I know it is true
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A restaurant orders more fresh produce than it estimates it needs. Mistakes might be made, or more consumers arrive than expected. Better to have too much than not enough. That business is just well prepared
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lazi-nadiaall.badoelmhmd-brhym-bdlmn-m-brhym
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I’m a big advocate of having an “Eat This First” bin in your fridge, or just dedicating part of a shelf to it. Any time you see something that only has a few days left on it, stick it on that shelf. Then, every time you open your fridge and think about what you want to eat, go to the “Eat This First” bin/shelf first.
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There is more food produced on this planet than we can consume. By definition that means some food will not be eaten. That’s the nature of food production.
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