apinya-bunyasarnapinya-bunyasarn

IT administrator on the weekends but my passion is my volunteer work in my community on the weekends.

Why we might be eating insects soon.

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Finding a bug in your food can be a moment of horror that kills the mood and your appetite in one fell swoop. But that might be about to change, according to Meticulous Research, who’ve crunched the numbers on why we’ll soon be voluntarily crunching insects.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/07/good-grub-why-we-might-be-eating-insects-soon
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apinya-bunyasarn
apinya-bunyasarn followed this discussion
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There are a number of factors in play and the answer is wrapped up in an understanding of how insects compare with the production and farming of other food types.

Per kilo of live weight, bugs emit less harmful gas than more mainstream farm animals. A cow, for example, produces 2.8 kg of greenhouse gas per kilo of live body weight. Insects, on the other hand, produce just 2 grams.

They also consume fewer resources than traditional livestock. For each kilo it weighs, a cow needs 10 kg of feed. Bugs on the other hand need just 1.7 kg.

Water, which is becoming an increasingly scarce resource in some parts of the world – and which is used liberally in intensive farming – offers another interesting comparison. To produce a single gram of insect protein, you’d need 23 litres of water. That might sound like a lot. But to get that same gram of protein from cattle, you’d need 112 litres of water.
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Are you looking forward to this? Would you be willing to eat insects if and when the time comes? What other solutions do you see that does not involve eating bugs?
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kaila-torres
kaila-torres followed this discussion
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Oh boy! This is not something I am looking forward too! I'd rather be a vegan than have to result to eating bugs.
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Call me selfish but I would still eat meat even if the protein content is better in insects, I'll pass. I just find eating them really gross!
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I would love to try insects. In some countries, they are a delicacy and if they're cooked right, I'm pretty sure they'll be delicious.
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Just thinking about eating insects is already making my stomach turn. I'm sure there are other ways than resorting to eating bugs.
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People don’t want to or they find it disgusting. It also makes almost no difference whether it’s whole or processed insects.
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I read a study made in Wisconsin about the benefit of eating crickets to gut health. Maybe if they make the food more palatable, I'd be willing to give it a try. Here is the link for anyone interested - https://www.allaboutfeed.net/New-Proteins/Articles/2018/8/New-study-Eating-insects-good-for-gut-health-318168E/
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Just thinking about eating insects is already making my stomach turn. I'm sure there are other ways than resorting to eating bugs.
I know what you mean! If you've travelled to Asia, there's a lot delicacies that involves eating bugs if you want to have a dry run. Haha! Kidding!
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People should feel confident to use and prepare insects, if that’s what they want. A lot of people often don’t know where insects can be bought. They’re no longer only available in health food shops, but also in supermarkets. Once you know where you can get them, you then still have to know what you can do with them.
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Definitely not looking forward to this. Maybe I'll be a farmer and start taking care of chickens soon. 2023 is five years from now and I am not prepared to eat insects just yet. Is there a way to ease into this?!
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Hey, don't diss the insect just yet. I saw on TV once that Noma, the Danish restaurant often ranked the best in the world, serves a dish that had Amazon ants since the chef says it tastes like lemongrass.
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Eeeew, I looked it up, it's called entomophagy, or insect eating. I think I'll go with vegetables before going insect.
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This is true! We learned in class that insects are chock-full of protein and rich in essential micro nutrients, such as iron and zinc. It's probably healthier than anything that you've eaten today.
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There is a positive outlook on the overall acceptance of entomphagy even in developed countries. As a staple food providing 20% of the world’s dietary energy and consumed by over 1 billion people, rice is an ideal vehicle to deliver nutrients carried by edible insects.
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