emilia-bartkowskiemilia-bartkowski

I sing around the world and check Gather when I’m traveling.

I studied at Yale School of Music and currently traveling in Asia for Mamma Mia!

Your Surgeons Childhood Hobbies May Affect You

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Medical schools are noticing a decline in students' dexterity, possibly from spending time swiping screens rather than developing fine motor skills.

Read more - https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/30/well/live/surgeons-hobbies-dexterity.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&fbclid=IwAR3PytV0TH-InoGPS2hZrn-p2QOnlX_T1AHBc4cRVuxuxW4df5HRxgy9_dI
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Building plastic models, meccano sets, building a model railroad, sewing, embroidery, knitting -- there are countless things boys & girls did at one time that improve dexterity. Playing the piano would be very good.
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The requirements for cursive have dropped significantly! We used to have 4 to 5 years of practice.
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playing the piano would be very good
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Oh, so filling in bubbles for tests doesn't prepare students for their careers?
Stop getting rid of music, art, carpentry, sewing, and other subjects that can develop fine motor skills as well as creativity to problem solve. Stop feeding the test makers wallets.
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Knitting, painting, sewing, writing (by hand), playing an instrument, and so many other practices can help us develop dexterity as well as skills in math, logic, persistence, vision, commitment, etc.
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The lack of real data to back up any of the anecdotes in this very poorly researched article should be an absolute embarrassment to the NYT.
Current surgical residents grew up with flip phones in high school - they were not swiping iPhones until much later in life. Even if they never learned to sew or play the piano, is there any actual evidence that they have poorer dexterity than their attendings had while they were training besides the attendings’ feelings that such is the case?
The only thing this article proves is that medical education is still riddled with abusive teachers who constantly whine that they had it harder than younger generations, and that this makes them better physicians somehow.
I would choose a surgeon with less case experience over a sleep-deprived, over-worked, burnt out surgeon any day of the week. Physicians in training already work inhumane hours for years on end. Despite what a bunch of old surgeons in this article keep saying, 80 hours per week is already way too much, and increasing these hours may get you into more surgical cases, but there is NO DATA to prove that it will make you a better surgeon because - and I can’t stress this enough - you can not learn when you’ve been awake for 48 hours straight.
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That’s a weird conclusion. Smart phones (specifically iPhones) didn’t become popular until after 2008 (released in July 2007). Anyone over the age of like 20 didn’t use touch devices as young children. Certainly anyone applying for medical specialties won’t have used them as young kids or preteens. I’m 29 and the first iPhone was released when I was 17, and most people didn't get them until later (my first iPhone purchase was when I was 23), and most of my friends who went the medical school track are in their first residencies and haven’t even made it to specializations yet. Are medical fields being flooded by the under 20 crowd for some reason?
(I’m not denying the phenomenon just seriously doubting this conclusion. It seems more likely to stem from the higher emphasis on academics and less on “extracurricular “ activities like art, music, sewing, knitting, shop classes...)
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What interesting observations exposed here for would-be surgeons I’d never considered these specific needs. This makes perfect sense!
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My daughter fixes all of our iPhones. Messing with those tiny parts have to be good for surgery.
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Interesting article. Similar to dental school admission where they have to do a practical sculpting from chalk, they should add something like that to speciality admissions other than what we currently use which is evaluations, research, responses during the interview. I am a specialist but not a surgeon but played piano throughout school and did lots of crafts as a child at various summer camps. I know that that has developed my sense of touch, spatial awareness, and ability to focus on small details for a long time. These skills are often cut from school or after school programs.
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Be natural
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